Women’s Health

Women’s Health (190)

 

Dear Doctor,

I delivered three weeks ago and I am not on any form of contraception. Am I at risk of unplanned pregnancy? When should I start using contraception, and which method is most suitable? Sally

 

Dear Sally,

You have a very pertinent concern. Effective contraception after delivery should be initiated as soon as possible. This prevents the likelihood of an unplanned pregnancy, and allows adequate spacing prior to subsequent pregnancies.

There are many disadvantages of conceiving shortly after a recent pregnancy, with poor health implications for you and your newborn.

 

The womb (uterus in medical terms) is a key organ that defines women and their reproductive potential. As soon as reproductive maturity is achieved, the uterus always keeps itself ready for carrying a pregnancy. It’s a dynamic organ that responds in a predictable manner to female hormones that are produced by the ovaries. If a pregnancy fails to occur, the lining of the uterus is shed away as the monthly period. In the event of a pregnancy, the uterine function changes to an environment that can support the pregnancy. There is thus no monthly period till after the baby is born. This cycle of events continues till the menopause, but can also be interrupted by disease processes or hysterectomy (surgical removal of the uterus).

 

Fibroids are non-cancerous growths on the womb (uterus), and are very common in women. Scientific studies estimate that fibroids occur in about one in every two women.

Fibroids usually develop prior to pregnancy, and it’s not uncommon for women to be told they have fibroids at the time of their first pregnancy scan. Fortunately, majority of women with fibroids in pregnancy will not experience any complications. The growth of the unborn baby is largely unaffected. Pregnancy advances normally, and delivery is not any different from that of other women without fibroids. 

 

Delivery under water is just what it sounds. It is the process of labor and delivery whilst immersed in a water tub. It is sort of a new-age appeal, with proponents and critics alike. A number of health facilities in Kenya offer water births. You will even find birth tubs for hire, or get tempted to deliver in your own bath tub at home. But you should approach water births with caution, there are few proven scientific benefits, but multiple risks.

 

 

A recurring reason for Gynecology visits is a decreased sex drive. Libido is the medical word used to describe sexual desire. Human sexual response is very complex and ill-understood, thus decreased libido cannot be addressed in a simplistic manner.

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