Public Health

Public Health (144)

Modern working environments are full of deliverables and deadlines, and many people struggle to fit it all into a typical eight-hour working day. Working smart doesn’t always get you an hour or so to spare. If you aren’t too careful, you may find yourself slipping down the path of workaholics. That means a struggle to fit in gym time, quiet relaxation moments, or even time for an unhurried healthy meal. You’d be losing in matters of health if all you did is work, work, and more work. You can let everything else slip, but you must dedicate time for health in any typical working day.

An acquaintance of mine recently needed to go through some complex medical interventions. It was a painful process, but thankfully all went well, or so it seemed.  At the point of discharge, her care team were all smiles, with good news of having successfully dealt with the offending disease. She was told there were no tell-tale remnants of residual disease, she could expect a full recovery. Unfortunately, it was a crafted message of half-truths. She didn’t fare very well subsequently, a repeat operation became necessary shortly thereafter. 

Healthcare industry is much like the hospitality industry. But whereas the hospitality industry is driven by the availability of leisure time and disposable income, the healthcare industry is driven by the need to beat unwanted disease. Both are comparable in aspects of quality of service, value for money and much more. You probably spend quite some time looking up nice holiday hotels. Could you do the same for your medical needs, and look for some exclusivity of care? 

There are some of us who frequently feel sick. We get all sorts of symptoms, and can’t help thinking of the worst diagnoses. Frequent trips to the doctor all turn a blank. Nothing to find on getting examined, and all tests always turn out normal. Sounds familiar? It’s called health anxiety, or if you want a more scientific term, hypochondriasis.

Do you remember the last time your doctor shook your hand as you settled into the consultation room? Or parted your shoulders as you went out the door? It may all not be too obvious, and some people wouldn’t want to shake hands anyway.

But there has been an ongoing observation of almost cold and impersonal interactions with doctors. Why is this the case?

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