The optimal fertility window for both women (and men) is narrow, and shrinks exponentially with advancing age. Pregnancies are best planned when fertility rates are highest, couples are in optimal health, and when chances of delivering a healthy baby are highest. Biologically, the optimal age bracket for the best fertility outcomes spans from the mid-20s to the mid-30s.
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Delayed conception isn’t an uncommon event. For most, it’s usually a transient phenomenon, with spontaneous conception occurring in the course of time. However, there should never be any hesitation to be evaluated, especially when the delay is more than one year. Older couples beyond the mid-thirties should be evaluated earlier, after around six months of trying to conceive.
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Most women in the reproductive age group are familiar with the term fibroid. Fibroids are ‘golf-ball’ like swellings commonly found within the body of the womb (uterus). They are fairly common, especially in African women. It is important to be aware that fibroids are not cancer, and can be left alone for the lifetime of the woman. The exact cause of fibroids is not known, though there appears to be a genetic link.
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Most of us have grown up with some ingrained habits. Some good, some bad, and some just plainly stupid. Some things we do subconsciously, but we still knowingly get onto pretty unhealthy habits. Being conscious of healthier behavior steers us clear of diseases we could well do without.
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Once you stop using a reversible contraceptive, you should expect to conceive fairly quickly. Some methods, like the injectables, may delay the resumption of regular periods depending on the duration of use. But once the periods resume, implying regular release of eggs (ovulation), conception should then follow. If however you do not conceive within a year, there is usually a likelihood that something else may be affecting your chances of conception.
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